How Color Affects Student Learning

 

It’s no secret—whether you’re homeschooling or you’re a teacher yourself, creating a positive schooling environment is hard. Still, there are tactics that can make it easier on yourself. One way that people don’t think about often is color. If you need more convincing, follow our guide on how color affects student learning. 

Helps with Memorization 

Memorization is a key part of learning and is a skill that can be incredibly beneficial for students. One of the best ways to improve a student's memorization is to use color-coded flash cards. Dividing up what needs to be learned in categories can make the information easier on the mind, and using colors is a great way to help with that. Colors are also useful for notetaking because you can highlight text to emphasize important information from readings.  

Provides Direction 

For young students, there is also a need for direction. Color can do this in several ways and make it easier for students to follow along with a lesson. For example, a math equation can be much easier to sort out if it’s divided up in different colors according to the different components of the problem.

Increases Productivity 

Certain colors can also help create a studious environment. A calming color, such as blue, can help with productivity. Being productive is another important part of school that can help students stay on task.  

Boosts Their Mood 

It’s also essential for a classroom to be a comforting environment. The power of color can also play a role in a student's mood. Placing a color like orange throughout the learning space can instantly boost a student’s mood subconsciously and make a classroom far more comforting.  

Encourages Organization 

The final part of our guide on how color can affect student learning has to do with organization. Becoming organized as a student is one of the best things you can do. With color-coding labels, any student can easily organize a binder or a textbook. There’s a lot of multitasking that happens in schooling, but organization can keep a student sane.